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Celebrating the 3rd Anniversary of the Black Women's Truth and Reconciliation Commission

 

Rape in the United States is a systemic crisis. The founders of Black Women’s Blueprint understood that one of the most common abuses Black women experience is sexual violence and built an organization dedicated to using a human rights lens to create Black survivor-centered interventions to stop sexual abuse.

 

One intervention we established was the formation of a Black Women’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (BWTRC) –  a transnational initiative with a Black diasporic analysis where survivors testify about their sexual assaults, made policy recommendations to end sexual violence, participate in healing rituals and receive apologies from harm-doers and survivor allies for the trauma they experienced. This communal and integrated response to sexual violence places the concept of justice in the hands of survivors so that we determine how to best heal and  reconcile ourselves, our families, and our communities.

 

Today marks three years since the first Black Women’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission took place, and we are still fighting each day to love on, heal with, and support survivors of rape and sexual abuse. We continue to believe survivors, support their holisitic well-being and create interventions to ending sexual and gender-based violence in all forms against Black women, girls, and all Black people impacted by patriarchal violence.

 

As we celebrate the BWTRC, we know that there is much more work to be done to end rape culture and bear witness to the atrocity of sexual violence. We will not stop fighting until sexual abuse and reproductive violation against Black women and girls ends.

 

Join us as we work to erect a monument to survivors and commemorate our Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

 

Honor what it takes for survivors to take flight to freedom.

 

Support the legacy of the Black Women's Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

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